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20131202
20131210
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English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 7:00am EST
research in the world. basicssion is to do science to understand how life works at the most detailed level and to apply that in terms of coming up with new insights that will prevent and treat disease. support tens of thousands of grants across the country, conducted by our world's most cutting-edge scientists in the u.s. who are working on things from cancer to hiv, two aides. you name it -- to aids. you name it. let's learn more about the history. your roots date back to the late of thebut you are part department of health and human services. what is your budget and how many people work for nih? guest: it is about $29 billion. the number of people who work about on the campus is 17,000. most of our work is done by the grants that we give to universities and institutions all over the country. not getur money does spent in bethesda, but gets spent in those great universities where you are hearing every day about medical breakthroughs. that is because nih supported the work. how long have you been at nih? guest: 20 years ago is when i got here. we were working on the human genome project. p
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 12:00am EST
labs. andft the area of research am now pursuing a career in science policy. i am working with a public education advocacy group in the district. i was wondering if you have any suggestions for early career scientists. how should we keep moving forward in these next couple of years? it is going to remain tough, even if we reach some sort of a deal. are the voice that i am most concerned about. i am glad you are moving in science policy. we need expertise there. many people in your situation would like to continue to do research and are finding it challenging to identify the path forward for them to do so. nih, we're doing everything we can to provide that kind of support. we are increasing the grants that are a bridge between a postdoctoral fellowship and an independent faculty position. we are making it possible for individuals that come in for their first nih grant application to only compete against each other instead of the established investigators that may have more of a track record. trying to give first-time investigators a leg up. thatl have to recognize while this is a histori
Bloomberg
Dec 6, 2013 5:00pm EST
works political science and international affairs. to see a guy with his experience and conviction, yet still his embrace and outreach to the united states, and frankly, to world leaders globally. he at one time could deal with the president's vision at the same time dealing with the president of libya and the he ad of the palestinian authority. he was a really man who reached widely for the purpose of bringing peace to this world. havebassador frazer, you met with many leaders from all over the world, particularly in africa. you have experience in kenya, zimbabwe, somalia. what did nelson mandela mean for africa? >> nelson mandela is the symbol of freedom in africa. many of the people across the continent rallied behind the veryapartheid struggle, a long struggle. remember, the national african congress actually started in 1914, and the country did not move to nonracial democratic governance until my 294, which was always the goal of the anc. and whether one is from nigeria or tanzania or closer to home, mozambique, across africa people rallied behind the anc in that struggle. i think
SFGTV2
Dec 2, 2013 5:30am PST
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 1:50am EST
for the purpose of teaching branches of art, science, and industry, best calculated to enable the scholars to acquire an independent livelihood. recognizing the importance of being able to move beyond the menial work and menial wages to which most women of the day were subject, john simmons has enabled generations of women to lead and self advocate, empowered with their own resources. those of us who have delighted so enormously from john simmons's philanthropy are delighted to be with you to witness the work of our founders contemporary, angelina grimke. we hope you enjoy the evening, and thank you for joining us. [applause] >> we have got some powerhouses in the audience with us tonight. not just here on the stage. we want to acknowledge some of the remarkable women officeholders who are present as well as their male allies. i will ask each group to stand and remain standing. please hold your applause until the end. i know that is going to be tough but really try. we are honored to have present tonight a number of women who were each the first woman to hold a different statewide office.
Bloomberg
Dec 4, 2013 9:00pm EST
discovered by the telescope. >> you are kind of the nsa of science. >> yeah, i guess that's a way of putting it. we are the collection agency for universal radiation. >> why the quiet zone? >> the energy that it normally receives is equivalent to the energy of an by a single snowflake hitting the ground. >> with no white noise on the radio or cell phone use, living in green bank is like traveling back in time. >> your life is a little slower, old-fashioned. >> general store sells everything and if you need to call home, use the payphone. it's a couple of miles down the road. and in case you were wondering, it costs $.50 to make a local call these days. >> and ring they have someone to enforce -- and they have someone to enforce the rules around town. most residents comply, but there is some rebellion. >> someone used to have a wi-fi access point set up and the name of it was "s crewyounraoprivateproperty." >> i live in the city and it drives me crazy. >> i said, listen. and everybody looked around and said, i don't hear nothing. and i said, that's what i like about this. >> greenburg, west v
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 11:30am PST
, who is this guy. >> reporter: this is leo. as a kid he was obsessed with science, os stron my, chemistry, physics. but then he fell in with the wrong crowd, became a father two years. two years ago, first lost his job and then his home. >> what did you think he wanted? >> i don't have anything, man. you got the wrong guy. no, you know, he just said, hey, this may sound strange. i put you an offer. i can either give you $100 and you spend it however you want to or i present you with this brand new laptop and teach you how to code. and instantly i just said, in my mind, door number two. >> reporter: he would write code for hours, for days, on the banks of the hudson or in a corner nook in patrick's office. at night patrick would go home and leo would go back outside. shelters just aren't his thing. which all seemed fine until winter blew in. >> reporter: how do you stay warm on those really bitter nights? >> go to the train station. bundle up with tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold. i keep telling him, i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> reporter: patrick just wanted
Al Jazeera America
Dec 9, 2013 6:00am EST
for courts to overturn convictions based on science that is later debunked so on november 18th the san antonio four reunited and meeting the granddaughter for the first time and ready to makeup for lost time. >> it was a death in the family and births. marriages and just so many things over the years that we have missed. >> reporter: the road aheld won't be easy, the women have been released but not exonerated and there is that to fight, jobs to find and lives to rebuild. the four say as long as they stick together they will do all that and more. heidi docastra al jazeera san antonio. >> more than 2000 people who were wrongfully convicted have been exonerated in the past two decades and spent an average of ten years in prison and 30% of them have been exonerated by dna evidence. the president obama and first ladder were there and billy joel and santana and oprah singer, jazz musician herbie joncock and these are performers who influenced culture through the arts. and the flash mob military style, the u.s. airforce ban surprised visitors at the washington and space museum and it starte
FOX
Dec 3, 2013 7:00am PST
and science. of the 34 developed countries involvedded in the study. u.s. ranked 26th in math, 21st in science and 17th in reading. that's despite the united states spending more for student than almost all other countries. the u.s. spends about $115,000 per student. the slovak republic spends about $53,000 a student. >>> no news may be good news for b.a.r.t. commuters. it's been ten day since the board asked union leaders to resubmit a revised contract without a disputed family leave provision. still no talk of the unions going on strike for the third time this year. it appears more and more likely that the unions will head to court to settle this contract dispute. >>> all right, pam. time about 7:12. a big meeting scheduled today on treasure island. why many people are being told they may have to pack up and move out of their homes. >>> devastating. >> a deadly shark attack in hawaii. >>> good morning. we're looking at a commute that's moderately heavy. as we look at 280 at the 880 interchange. you will see it's slow. coming up i will show you what the san mateo bridge looks like. >>> still
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 4:00pm PST
remember thinking in my head, huh, who is this guy? >> this is leo. as a kid, he was obsessed with science, astronomy, chemistry, physics, but became a father too soon. lost his job, then his home. >> at first, what did you think he wanted? >> i didn't think, you got the wrong guy. he said, hey, this may sound strange, i'm going to approach you with an offer. i'll give you $100 and you spend it however you want to or i'll present you with this new laptop and teach you how to code. instantly, i said in my mind, door number two. >> he would write code for hours, for days. on the banks of the hudson or in a corner nook in patrick's office. at night, patrick would go home and leo would go back outside. shelters just aren't his thing, which seem fine until winter blew in. how do you stay warm on those really bitter nights? >> a train station. loick tons of blankets. >> it's getting really cold. he's like, i'm good, man, let's keep going. >> see, patrick just wanted to get him employed and housed, but leo had other ideas. what did you want to do with this information he was teaching you? >> make
Al Jazeera America
Dec 2, 2013 10:00pm EST
on to get there. >> i'm joined by derrick pitts, scientist at the franklin institute science museum. there's disagreement over the last few days about what happened to ison. nasa says it's a gonna, is there something there in. >> i think what happened, antonio was a to usle between this not very well consolidated nucleus, the gravitational pull of the sun and the heat of the sun, the heat of the sun sublime, frozen gases and the loosely compacted material left in the nucleus in the comments had nothing to hold it together. the solar wind took care of it after that. as we look at the images from the satellites looking at the sun. what we see is what's left of ison, a mere shadow of its former self. >> no hope that we'll get a good show in the sky. >> i don't think we'll see much from the ground. folks will be out with binoculars. a big telescope under dark skies might show us a whisk of what is left. it's left to the satellites on orbit. >> the possibility of it hitting earth was ruled out before it passed the sun. is there a chance that it blew apart and there are fragments that something
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
and sciences. a former director of the leon leavy center for buying agraph in new york. she teaches in the msa programs of the new school glover columbia university school of the arts and has taught sarah lawrence college and union college in new yorkie she was washington irving professor of modern literary. please welcome brenda wineapple and nathaniel philbrick. [applause] >> on my way over here, nathaniel and i talked about how both of these subjects are obviously the most -- among the most notable eras of american history. how could we characterize a comparative deal between your book and brenda's when it comes to intensity, and relevance, where both in the revolution and the civil war. there wasn't very much of a clear future in either era. >> i was thinking about this question when i heard about the great opportunity to be paired with brenda, and my bunker hill begins actually -- begins and ends with john quincy adams. it begins with him at seven years old, standing on a hill with his mother, then in her early 30s, on june 17, 1775, watching the battle of bunker hill from a hill about 12
FOX News
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> last year was child's play. this year, dealing with all experienced killers. >> any last minute advice? >> stay alive. >> that was a clip from the newest installment in "the hunger games." the lead character carry as bow and arrow and it is so popular that it is single handedly boosting interest in archery across the country. a 5th grader is facing possible expulsion for playfully firing an imaginary arrow at a classmate. joining me now, kelly goss, rick gurnell and a criminal defense attorney. we have hot topics. that's the first one. it's the sign for virgo basically. now if you flash it you get suspended and maybe expelled. >> ridiculous. here's how ridiculous it is. if we are going to punish the kid for pretending to shoot a bow and arrow let's ticket the parents for parking their unicorn in a fire zone. the kid is 10. we encourage them to use their imagination. >> it will be on his permanent record. >> i'm so grateful i'm not growing up in this age of political correctness r
FOX News
Dec 5, 2013 3:00am PST
at a maximum right. you do your proper testing. and the type of things we're seeing isn't rocket science. web application development is a proven science. companies do it alt time. >> this does not need to be a silicon valley space project. this is bread and butter business application web site. i would agree with mr. kennedy in the five, $10 million range max. >> okay. so you could have built it for five or 10 million. extraordinarily, darrell issa yesterday said that he had testimony that apparently a large internet technology company offered the federal government, we will build your site for free. and the federal government passed on it. who was it? i was reading on-line, it was probably ibm because i think in 2010, the ceo was talking about yeah, we offered the federal government to build it for them, but they passed. think about that. we could have saved a billion dollars. it could have been done by ibm, the gold standard in that kind of technology and we passed. what? well, maybe there is no incentive in washington to save money or do it right. >> and david kennedy, who you heard from,
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 2:00pm PST
? >> we're talking about delivery. there's an item going into the vehicle. i know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> so what's the next big thing? the only person who can answer those kinds of questions is our lor lorie siegel. >> i think right now we're hearing a lot about personalization technology. almost siri-like apps. they almost anticipate what you want, which is pretty interesting. we spoke last week about a technology where you walk into the store, your phone knows your purchasing history and it will give you a push notification and say, hey, you might want to check this out. that kind of stuff is in the works. tech is moving so far beyond the smartphone. it's not just the hot new apps. we're talking robots and drones. it's an interesting time for technology. >> i think we've done stories on auto plants that have replaced workers with robots. now you see drones, having drones with the ability to deliver packages. behind the steak and shake, when does all of this take place? >> these are all great id
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 2:00am EST
science as well as i think the legal profession helping to decide which of these developments are appropriate. how can we best use them. caller: one the things i enjoy about talking to groups of judges is you have this group has the collective wisdom to figure out how to use this information to its best possible purposes and, of course, to avoid any potential harmful outcomes. i would like that thank you for your attention this morning and i would be happy to address any question is. [ applause ] >> we have time for two or three questions. please come up to the microphones in front. and remember, you will be immortalized on c-span. >> when you take swabs and tell you where you came from and what your future possibility medical problems are. how accurate are those predictions and is it worth the money? >> a great question. the question was what so-called direct to consumer testing where you send a saliva sample in to a company and they type your d.n.a. using what we call a d.n.a. chip and you get back a lot of information. information about your approximate ancestry and about y
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 8:00am PST
take tests to see how they're doing in math, science, and reading. a look at the most recent results in math. shanghai, china topped the list, tested way above average. u.s. students came in 26th, below average. in reading, shanghai tops again, u.s. finishing 17th. and in science, guess who. shanghai. u.s. students came in at number 21. i talked to two education experts to find out why u.s. students are falling behind and what we can do to fix that. michelle reed, former chancellor of d.c. public schools and steve perry, principal of capital prep magnet school in connecticut. i asked steve what he thinks the biggest problem is. >> we know what it's not, it's not the kids. kids are manufactured the same way they've always been. even in america we find that the states that have the highest performance have the highest standards and highest expectations, not just the states but the schools themselves. we have this middle class malaise where students are expected not to have homework, not to be pushed because that makes them feel uncomfortable. where in other countries, comfort is not wh
CSPAN
Dec 6, 2013 4:00pm EST
is an cozy a syt four and six sick science in the kumble justice system. from colorado springs colorado, this is an hour and a half. >> with experience with the microphone -- okay. how's this? great. good morning everyone. it's a pleasure to be here today i would like to thank the organizers for inviting me to come to this beautiful place i would like to talk with you this morning at hank mentioned we would start with a very basic review of dna. what is dna, how does it work and why should you be interested in it. our focus on an important intersection between the dna and the law and that isn' is a diffe of genetics, genetics conference of applications and illustrate some of the points that with the case studies in which the dna has been used in for the context. so, our body is a marvelous collection of about 100 trillion cells. and inside almost all of these cells in the nucleus of the cell's here we can find dna. the dna is organized among chromosomes. we absorb these under a microscope and if we look three closely at these chromosomes, we see this double helix structure, the classic
MSNBC
Dec 8, 2013 9:00am PST
, america scores 26th in math. 17th in reading and 21 in science. >> okay. it may be average in most areas, but it did rank near the top in spending at number five. >> yes. >> are we getting most bang for our buck here? >> so this is a little troubling. the report notes that spending does not necessarily correlate to higher scores. so the united states spends between the ages of 6 and 15 $115,000 per student. to put that in some context, the slovak republic has scores similar to ours, and they only spend $53,000. >> that's extraordinary when you think about how much we're spending and what we're getting. the importance of these findings, julia, put this into perspective. what does it say about our educational system, and should we be worried about those low math scores and the way we're coming in against everybody else on pretty much every other barometer? >> so it is a little bit concerning, but to put it in more context, the united states has never really done well on these sorts of international assessments. since the '60s and '70s, we've scored in the middle or bottom of international
MSNBC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00am PST
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. like a squirrel stashes nuts, you may be muddling through allergies. try zyrtec® liquid gels. nothing starts working faster than zyrtec® at relieving your allergy symptoms for 24 hours. zyrtec®. love the air. [ male announcer ] this december, experience the gift of true artistry and some of the best offers of the year at the lexus december to remember sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. ♪ >>> let's take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. the "l.a. times," ukraine's president is facing a 48 hour deadline to disband his government. anti-government protesters toppled a statue of lenin, the founder of the vote union. the protesters warn they will target the president's home next if he doesn't disband the government. demonstrators are rallying against the government's decision to walk away from a european union trade deal to keep close ties with russia. >> "chicago tribune," the extraordinary achievements of the 2013 kennedy center honorees were celebrated last night in washington. recipients included
CNN
Dec 2, 2013 2:00pm PST
like a lot of science fiction, but amazon believes -- is this for real, ryan? >> wolf, jeff bezos is touting this as if it's very real. he says in four or five years, he hopes to be able to get your order to your door with a drone within a half hour after you place it. he's made point, click and shop a huge part of our lives. now amazon's ceo is promising delivery by drone. he unveiled his plan to cbs' "60 minutes". >> these are octocopters, but there's no reason they could be use as delivery vehicles. >> reporter: she says the vehicles they're developing can carry objects weighing up to five pounds, which he says covers 86% of the items they deliver. they can fly within 10 miles of any distribution center and they would be autonomous. that means no operator with a joystick. they'll program the coordinates of your house and it will fly there. but there are all sorts of potential pitfalls like how will they safeguard against from veers off-course and hitting us in the head? how will they avoid unknown obstacles on the roof? caitlin lee is a uav expert with ihs janes. what else can
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 6:00am PST
. >>> proficiency in reading, math and science in 65 countries. according to an international assessment group, u.s. students did not make the global top 20 and assessments remained flat while other countries made gains. >>> singapore and hong kong. the u.s. was 36 behind the slovak republic. >>> in rhode island, the war on christmas is finally over. the state house tree will now officially be called a christmas tree. for the past two years, the governor made the controversial decision to call the tree a holiday tree. but he has since changed his mind because he appears >> i want to concentrate on the real issues. and if this is what people care about rather lowering the taxes and providing the services, sobeit. >> the 17 foot christmas tree will be lit on thursday. >>> a special holiday hug for one guy. a manny tee hugging the diver's foot. he was eight feet long and probably weighed around 1,000 pounds. >>> in the news this morning, they're not giving up. fast food workers will walk off the job in 100 cities on thursday. they're pushing for what they call a living wage. that means 15 bucks an h
FOX Business
Dec 6, 2013 11:00am EST
and foremost, it just sounds like science fiction. is this an achievable goal in terms of raising the money and executing the plan? >> we are biased but we certainly believe so. logistically it is the mega maritime project, heavily capitalized project, the engineering is fair and assuming there's enough general interest, globally it is a doable project and we will continue and pursuing them and trying to bring it to fruition. dagen: how much money have you raised? >> negligible dollars. we went public a week ago and truthfully the global response has been overwhelming. not so much at this point in time relative to capital but as far as interests, people wanting to buy units on the ship or work on the ship, the global interest has been we are inundated in e-mail on our server. dagen: it is a share, not a floating island that will be stationary? >> no. it has propulsion, a mobile superplatform, analogous to a small land based community of 50 to 1,000 people, circumnavigating the globe. there are number of notable engineering firms that have the ability and logistically assuming the capital ca
FOX Business
Dec 6, 2013 1:00pm EST
sciences. somebody thinks you're doing right. stock is doing okay too. >> the stock is doing okay and reflection after the team and efforts we're making really helping patients. tracy: ceo francois nadir. doctor, thanks for being here. sticking with it for all the people out there. >> we'll do that. thank you. tracy: ash? >> ashley: thank you, tracy. dow is higher by triple digits on great jobs numbers but will wall street fear a fed taper that could come soon irrather than later? we'll look over that next half hour. tracy: christmas parties are back. in wine with me we'll talk about the new york's morrell's about the trend they're seeing. ashley: gotta have it. we'll go to the outlet malls for the final segment of our series. the president of premium outlets is here next. tracy: as we head out to break, look at some winners and losers on the s&p 500. electronic arts is up today. 5.24%. must mean ashley's boys are buying games. we'll be right back? ashley: yes. ♪ hi honey, did you get e toaster cozy? yep. got all the cozies. [ grandma ] with n fedex one rate, i could ll a box an
CNN
Dec 3, 2013 3:00am PST
and they're being used to do science surveys. >> these are not places that have skyscrapers and a lot of -- in theory, there's not a lot of other aerospace clutter, if you will. that's a big deal. it would never work in manhattan, for example. >> well, i guess i would never say never. the truth is technologically speaking they could fly one of these things from downtown to midtown to your offices here today. >> look at cars. they can tell you when to stop, how fast, when to move. >> that's true, never say never. >> the technology greatly exceeds their ability. >> how about flying in inclimate weather? could the flying ha batibachi, wasn wanted to take off -- >> i raise you one. thieves. there's a $40,000 drone. i'll shoot it out of the sky. >> they're doing research right now to use drones to carry explosives for avalanche control in the mountains. >> that would be fascinating. >> when it's so foggy or the weather is so bad you can't send people out for avalanches for highways, for instance -- >> genius. >> you could program it to travel up at noon and drop an explosive for avalanche
FOX News
Dec 8, 2013 3:00am PST
. this is a science which is why i use the boxing terminology. if you're at home and you know, boxing is known as the sweet science. they could have posted this at 12 noon instead of 6:00 a.m. and gotten dramatically more people seeing it. >> a store owner in new jersey thinks they've done it, they need to do so much more. you have another example, holiday inn. what's this retweet that they did? >> this is my favorite thing to hate on. there are way too many businesses retweeting nice things being said about them. let me make this point once and for all. if you retweet something that's being said about you that's awesome, you are bragging. >> you also have a tip, avoid one-way conversations. again, sort of the bull horn effect. what do you mean by this? >> again, it's that blasting out. i mean, social media is about listening as well. it's customer service. i wrote this book to build a manual for all of the people who have small businesses, a lot of people who have young entrepreneurs budding. entrepreneurship is exploding. i wanted to tactically show them how to do it. if you're talking about
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 2:00pm EST
is a sort of doomsday science that wobbles and pessimism. i recall the famous statement by president lyndon johnson when he described intelligence, he developed the memory of when he was milking a cow on the farm down at the river as a young man, and he said he would get the bucket filled with pure milk and then the cat would relieve itself in the milk. and president johnson said the relief -- and he met relief in the bad way -- that was intelligence. [laughter] so you can imagine how that hurt our feelings. [laughter] but there is another metaphor that i often hear and that is the famous woody allen comment that we in the intelligence community like to provide options to policymakers, and so we look out at the world and say, we are at a crossroads. one path leads to death and destruction, and the other path leads to total annihilation. [laughter] and we hope you policymakers would be able to the wisdom to choose the right course. but, in fact, in my experience and the spirits i think we're going to relate today on the balkans is that intelligence is, when it works well, a collaborative ent
NBC
Dec 9, 2013 7:00am PST
. >> it gives them the about to put together the story. >> reporter: but there's a big gender gap in science, technology, engineering and math. women make up almost half the work force but fill less than a quarter of jobs in those fields. goldieblocks isn't the only company giving girls serious play things. >> lego friends. >> reporter: lego has gotten in on the game. barbie is a computer engineer, and roominate, a doll house construction set that comes we electric electrical s electrical curcuits. talk about girl power. >> reporter: a future where girls can dream big. >> girls are out there making a difference in the world too. >> now you promise notice there is pink in goldieblocks. pink and purple are the most popular girl colors. it's not about that but giving them toys that use their brain. >> gift ideas for my nieces. >> it's great. thank you so much. coming up next, we heard of therapy dogs but how about therapy chickens? one family is fighting to keep their young son's beloved animal. it helps this little boy. we have the story coming up. but first, this is "today" on nbc. [ female a
Al Jazeera America
Dec 4, 2013 6:00am EST
classroom, according to test results focussing on maths, english and science. singapore, taiwan and south korea are at the top of the list. the american results were called a picture of stagnation. the test was given to 50-year-olds in 55 countries. a man was trapped for three days under water after his boat capsized off the coast of name earia. it was an accident that took the lives of many people. >> this was the mission to recover bodies from a boat. suddenly a rescue diver finds this. >> harrison survived for three days in a pocket of air, drinking water and fizzy drinks. is 11 of the crew died when it capsized and sank. >> a diver pulls harrison from the sunken boat. >> harrison is now safe and with a story of remarkable survival to tell. . >> it's amazing. he survived off one bottle of soda. >> anunderwater discovery of a different sore. this 400 foot mega-subways found off the sea floor of hawaii. it dates back to world war ii. it was one of five that met a similar fate. >>> in australia a birt took a camera on the flight of its life. he took off on a 70 mile journey. the bird's fl
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2013 8:00am EST
are the aol and compuserve in this story. now that said, it's actually quite a difficult computer science challenge to build a distributed social system that works in a timely manner. and we know this because it used to exist. net news, if anyone was using the internet in the 1990s, they'll remember that. and, essentially, it was a social media discussion system that was based on open standards. but it was rather slow, and it quickly became rather unwieldily. the volume of traffic passing through it was really too big, and a lot of isps didn't want to get involved with it. there's clearly a lot of technical challenges that would need to be overcome for this to happen. but i'm keeping a very close eye on efforts like dias pa -- diaspora. there seems to be a new one every few months to create an open standard for social networking. the same could happen to to facebook and twitter in the next decade. >> host: but whatever form social media takes in the future, you write, one thing is clear, it is not going away as this book has argued. social media is not new. it has been around for centurie
CSPAN
Dec 7, 2013 1:30pm EST
't believe that, but science, he paused, the immediate contingency overtook him, pull some back from the edge of the theoretical abyss. i made a small investigation of this fellow, he continued. i could have gone deeper if i had known. do you mean you have been to a medium, in quired jr. humorously? he stared and laughed. a medium. about gets the? no, i haven't. i set up making the small investigation of his past. and you found he was an oxford man? an oxford man, he was incredulous. he wears a pink suit. nevertheless he is an oxford man. oxford, new mexico. daisy invited him. in new him before we were married from god knows where. we were all irritable and aware of it as we drove into the silence. then as dr. t. j. elbert's faded guys came into sight down the road remembered get the's caution about gasoline. we have enough to get as into town, said tom. there is a garage right there. i don't want to get stalled out in this baking heat. tom through on the brakes in patiently and as we slid to an abrupt dusty stop under wilson's sign after a moment the proprietor emerged from the interior of t
FOX News
Dec 6, 2013 6:00am PST
? >> well, you know, modern science and chemistry doesn't match the philosophies and religious beliefs the middle ages, it just doesn't but there's this, call this mad rage against things western even as terrorists are welcome willing to use our technologies. but bill, i have to say two things. i don't believe this young man was target of a robbery type crime because he was jogging. second i have no doubt this was us lamists. maybe i will be proved wrong but i would be shocked if it was anybody else. your viewers should know, our viewers should know, the tradition in which this young man followed goes back to the 19th century. heroic americans, beginning with missionaries spreading out to secular educators we've been going for almost two centuries to the middle east, to jerusalem, to beirut, to cairo, to libya to try to help these people forward. bill, there are two kinds of american teachers that go today to the middle east. ones go for the big bucks in rich gulf states. but people like ronnie smith who believed they can make a personal difference, not a government. not an army. not e
MSNBC
Dec 4, 2013 3:00am PST
planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is... 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energy efficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. >>> up next, the surprising admission to the engineer at the controls of sunday's deadly train crash up next on "morning joe." this is the quicksilver cash back card from capital one. it's not the "fumbling around with rotating categories" card. it's not the "getting blindsided by limits" card. it's the no-game-playing, no-earning-limit-having, deep-bomb-throwing, give-me-the-ball-and-i'll-take- it-to-the-house, cash back card. this is the quicksilver cash card from capital one. unlimited 1.5% cash back on every purchase, everywhere, every single day. so let me ask you... what's in your wallet? medicare open enrollment. of year again. s
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 3:00am PST
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. my boyfriend has a lot of can't-miss moments. i checked out the windows phones and saw the lumia 1020 has 41 megapixels. so i can zoom way in even after i take the picture. and i can adjust the shot before i take it so i get it exactly how i want. so, i went with a windows phone. maybe i just see things other people don't. ♪ honestly ♪ i wanna see you be brave ♪ >>> there was a time when i was a young invincible. [ laughter ] after five years in this office people don't call me that any more. [ laughter ] i am not allowed for security reasons to have an iphone. [ laughter ] i don't know what your bills are. my suspicion is that for a lot of you between your cable bill u-phone bill, you're spending more than 100 bucks a month. the idea you wouldn't want to make sure that you got the health security and financial security that comes with health insurance for less than that price, you know, you guys are smarter than that and most young people are as well. >> that was president obama pitching obama
MSNBC
Dec 8, 2013 5:00am PST
and not tap water was more science fiction. this week on tuesday, the house voted to extend that law. sorry. got a little teleprompter screw up here. i'm reading the same thing over and over again. but the -- it is on to the senate now, and what is -- what makes it so complicated in the senate is the fact that senators are basically -- some senators, particularly democratic senators, who are saying that the law doesn't go far enough as it is currently written. so the question now, the dilemma now, that the senate faces is do you pass this law, do you renew this law that was created in 1988, take the attention you can get on that for another ten years, or do you wage a fight, push a fight here, saying we want this law to go farther, we want new provisions in there that would make it impossible for guns that would be printed on the new 3d printers that are coming out, that would make it impossible for those guns to pass through airport security. so that is the dilemma that they are -- that they are facing. now to give you a little history and context for this, you have to go back to the last
CNBC
Dec 2, 2013 9:00am EST
know this looks like science fiction. it's not. >> wow. >> this is early. this is still years away. drops the package. >> there's the package. >> come and get your package. we can do half-hour delivery. >> half-hour delivery? >> half-hour delivery and carry objects we think up to five pounds. >> that service amazon prime air could be ready for use in four or five years and could carry objects to discuss merles within a ten-mile radius of a distribution center. when's the worst that could happen? tweet us. we'll get your responses later on in the morning. people had ideas already about worse worst-case scenarios. >> try landing in the streets in manhattan. >> yes. >> the other thing is have you noticed how innocent they look? cute little drones. as time goes on, you can see it's the future. presumably they're armed or they'll -- >> hellfires on there. >> did you see quot blif i don't know" with tom cruise? >> no. it was a part of "homeland." >> i won't give away more. >> thank you very much. they keep innovating and, carl, we have seen apparently they're not the first to think about
CNN
Dec 7, 2013 3:00am PST
-d plastic gun that could go right through a metal detector and on a plane was science fiction. today, it is a reality. they are out there. more are coming. we need to extend that ban. it is not a good idea for us to allow the plastic guns to get through metal detectors on planes and secure environments. as these guns have become a reality, this law is going to expire. it will expire on monday. i led the house of representatives on a bipartisan basis on extending the law. it passed the house of representatives. now the senate has to act very early next week or else the law expires and it is terminated and america is a more dangerous place. >> quickly, do you think there will be a hold up in the senate? >> i hope not. we have to extend the ban and modernize it to require every single firearm have one metal or two metal parts that can be detected by metal detectors. some say we should not extend the ban unless we get the modernizati modernization. let's extend the ban and modernize it and keep america safe. >> senator schumer says let's keep the ban so let it be added. what you are prop
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